Monday, April 19, 2010

“Invictus” by William Ernest Henley

The next day we headed back to Kamakura so I could finally show her the Daibutsu. Photobucket

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Then for a dramatic jump from huge and impressive to small and cute, we went to Hase-dera.

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Do Not Miss Out on the cave, unless you can’t bend over, then I guess it’s okay.

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On one hand, revisiting the same place is a challenge to avoid taking the same pictures I did the first time. On the other, sometimes I’ll realize later that I picture I took just because it’s interesting is actually something significant. The first time, I took a closeup of the statue on the left because it was so unique from the usual Japanese statues. I missed that the pond itself is in the shape of the counterclockwise swastika or “manji” that represents harmony in Buddhism and indicates a temple on maps. And the statue is of Datsueba, “clothes snatching woman” who strips and punishes the dead before they can cross the river into the afterlife.

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Beautiful view. Many people eating lunches on a wide porch that day. A sign said, “The hawk will take your food, be careful!” I thought they were being cautious, then said hawk divebombed someone.
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This koi was awesome – he had found the part of the pond that was sectioned off to keep the foam from spreading, and was gulping it down like it was the most delicious thing ever. I found a good vantage point and could see right down his throat when he opened up.
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We also went to Kousokuji temple, which wasn’t terribly impressive but had a beautiful garden.

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We ate lunch at the Cafe Cha-ca up the road across from Hase-dera. Though there were some curious sounding things on the menu like Basil-cheese waffles – they were surprisingly delicious, and my mother vouched for her taco salad.

 

鎌倉 大仏 長谷寺

Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll.
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.

1 comment:

Sex and Japan - Dating in Japan said...

What absolutely beautiful pictures!